The Kavanaugh Circus

Written by Jaron Bullington, October 4th, 2018

This article is not meant to say that Doctor Ford or Kavanagh are guilty, or completely innocent, but instead bring light to the issue at hand- the ignorance of the due process of law.

For many weeks, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has been in the light of the mass media. Headlines upon headlines storm every person’s social media and newsfeeds, and it is one of the most heated subjects of this year. Why, though, you may ask, has Kavanaugh been at the center of this media attack? He was accused of rape and sexual assault, by Doctor Christine Blasey Ford.

Kavanaugh has been labeled many things these past few weeks- rapist, misogynist, etc.- but why is he labeled this way? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, right? The fact of the matter is that there has been absolutely no corroborating evidence to confirm Ford’s original claim, something crucial to determining if Kavanaugh is guilty of said crime. The basic feature of U.S. law is the idea of due process, or the idea of an accused person being innocent until proven guilty in the court of law. It seems that this case, the case of Kavanaugh v. Ford, has had many people abandon this idea. Sparks have been flying in the #MeToo movement, and throughout the left, some outright saying or implying that Kavanaugh is indeed guilty. It is true, and undeniable that Doctor Ford’s statement in the Senate judiciary committee was heart wrenching, it felt meaningful. But, as is law, guiltiness is not determined by how someone acts or feels, instead, it is determined by cold, hard evidence. Doctor Ford does not have it.

There are many that say to “Believe the Victim”, or in this case, “Believe Doctor Ford”. This is a dangerous thing, and many do not realize why. If we inherently say that the accuser is a victim, before even determining if the accused is guilty, there is a problem. This ignores basic law, again, due process. The court should decide whether the accused is guilty, and then we can start to talk about the accused. What this creates is a sort of “guilty until proven innocent” culture, where the “victim” has bias toward them, not due to substantial evidence, but because they said that they were victimized.

This also hurts those that are victims of actual rape, and sexual assault. It demeans their claim, because of others who were trusted or “believed” but were proven wrong in the court of law. It is a “the boy who cried wolf” sort of situation; if so many people say that they were victimized by a person, but proven wrong in the court, other people who may have actually been victimized might not be trusted.

Overall, the Kavanaugh hearing has been an absolute circus; a parade. A total ignorance of the law. Our elected officials act like children in a daycare- arguing, screaming, and running away. If there’s one thing to take out of this (other than to trust in the due process of law), it is the fact that we, as the next generation, need to get out and vote.

One thought on “The Kavanaugh Circus

  1. I really like this article. It articulates a lot of things while staying unbiased, which is hard when you feel a certain way about the topic. And I love the last point! You can pre-register pretty young, if I remember correctly.

    Also, I think it would have been important to note a few statistics. If you go to http://sarahbeaulieu.me/the-truth-about-false-accusation there is a great infographic. It’s a bit out of date, however, it drives a point home. According to the site, and other sources, only 2% of rapes are false. Most go unreported and many are found innocent even with evidence.

    Like

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