Month: January 2019

About Asian Club

Asian Club is an organization at Lake Howell that aims to educate the student body about Asian culture and society. As Asian culture is mostly overlooked in pop-culture and western society, this club attempts to showcase Asian countries and their culture. The current president is Hannah Tran, a senior at Lake Howell, and the sponsor is Mr. Agagnina. Meetings are held the third Tuesday of every month, in room 1-232, with rare exceptions.

 

Each month will represent a different country; for example, October was Thailand and November was the Philippines. We will enjoy cuisine from that month’s selected country as we discuss their history and the current events of the country. Our goal is to shine a light on Asian culture in a way where high school students will be able to enjoy it and interact with the culture. Asian club tries to immerse students into Asian society through discussions and cuisine; as most members consider themselves as Asian-Americans, this club acts as a safe space to discuss current events and politics with one another. It serves as a great way to learn more about Asia than you would in a normal class setting.

 

If you want to get more information, you can join the remind for Asian Club by texting “@lhhsac” to 81010 to stay updated on upcoming meetings and events for Asian Club. We will be sharing the date for the next meeting soon! Dues are $15 (including the shirt) and $10 (not including the shirt). Seniors must have paid dues and the requirement for meetings is at least one meeting attended in every quarter in order to receive a cord. New members are welcome at any time; Asian Club is open to every student at Lake Howell regardless of race. Asian Club is truly a rewarding experience and it is highly recommended that you join! Hope to see everyone at the next meeting!

By: Hannah Tran

The Issue of Climate Change

The recent weather change has done a lot more damage than the news has discussed. These various hurricanes, flooding, and tropical storms are just a few elements of the weather changes. Homes have been destroyed and families have been torn apart due to the most recent hurricane, Hurricane Michael, but maybe there’s a reason hidden behind all of these anomalies.

 

Climate change has been a hot button issue for quite a long time; unfortunately, the President of the United States has been quick to deny any sliver of evidence presented to him. But what causes climate change? And why does it affect the world’s population?

 

To answer the first question, the Compassion in World Farming website says that factory farming “intensifies climate change, releasing vast volumes of greenhouse gases.” Greenhouse gases have the ability to trap heat in the earth’s atmosphere, which could end up increasing the earth’s temperature twofold by 2050 unless we take action to stop it. Additionally, carbon dioxide levels will have doubled by then, which will increase the temperature with effects that no scientist has been able to accurately predict. One major factor that contributes to carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is car emissions. The industry present in America is one that craves energy–one that has the need to manufacture and dig and take the natural resources straight from the earth and harm it at the same time. The NCA (National Climate Association) has stated that the national average of precipitation has skyrocketed 30 percent! And this is can be attributed to the heat–warmer air usually contains more water vapor than cooler air, therefore increasing the amount of heavy downpours and tropical storms.
Now, that it is clear that America should make a change to stop this from destroying the earth. How does this affect the world? Take a look at any hurricane in the last decade and realize how much power they get. Not only has the intensity of hurricanes risen in recent years, the carbon dioxide emissions and greenhouse gases have increased as well. Now look at the death toll, destruction, and injuries–thousands of homes and businesses have been destroyed along with families that lived and worked within them. The facts are there, the statistics are there, and the deaths certainly are too. For more information about this topic, these are the links used in the article.

 

Sources:
https://nca2014.globalchange.gov/highlights/report-findings/extreme-weather
https://www.ciwf.org.uk/factory-farming/environmental-damage

 

By: Abdiel Perez

“Smallfoot” Movie Review

Are you looking for a new animated movie to enjoy with your family? One that is family friendly and shares a valuable lesson? Well, you’re in luck! The new animated movie “Smallfoot” has just hit the theaters, and everyone you know is either talking about it or about to be. The cast includes famous actors and actresses like Zendaya Coleman, Lebron James, Channing Tatum, and James Cordon! You don’t want to miss out on this phenomenal cast. Another reason to watch the movie is that it carries an important lesson that anyone can learn from–it teaches viewers to never judge others by their appearance and to trust the people around you. This movie is just as entertaining for adults as it is for young children. The soundtrack has catchy songs, the adventure will keep everyone wanting more, and the movie’s stellar comedy will make anyone laugh.  The movie starts off introducing us to a civilization of Yetis who believe that humans are dangerous. It all starts with a Yeti known as Migo–while adventuring, he notices a human-sized shoe and footprints on the floor. Once he notices the strange footprint, he goes home, triumphantly chanting that he has found a “smallfoot.” Everyone dismisses his excitement and considers him to be delusional. However, Migo’s friends trust him and believe that there is another “creature” other than a Yeti. The adventurous band of friends decide to search for the mysterious human to prove that they are real.

 

The Yetis start by going separate ways to find the human and, eventually, come across many clues. Migo and Meechee head far away from their home into the unknown and soon find a human store. Eventually, a human appears and Migo attempts to talk to the young man. Much to his dismay, though, the human can’t understand what the Yeti is saying. Communication between the two doesn’t work very well since their languages are both different. On the other hand, the young human, played by James Corden, is shocked by the event. The movie soon reveals to the audience that he has studied Yetis his whole life. Despite the initial shock, the two begin to admire each others’ presences; the human begins to take pictures of the Yeti while vlogging his unexpected experience. Migo is confused by the young man’s actions, but continues to attempt to communicate with the man. James is taken aback by the Yeti’s insistence and believes that the creature is starting to threatening him. He suddenly faints from fear, and the Yeti cheerfully picks up the human to show off to the other Yetis back home. In conclusion, “Smallfoot” is a fun, feel-good movie that will engage the audience from the start to end. Don’t forget to hit the theaters when you have a chance! You don’t want to miss this amazing movie!

 

By: Aly Sickles

 

A Glimpse Inside NJROTC

NJROTC is a course at Lake Howell High School. NJROTC stands for Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps. NJROTC offers a lot of various opportunities and activities where you can learn about the navy and its principles as well as receive training to be leaders and better members of our society.

After school teams include armed basic, unarmed basic, armed expedition, unarmed expedition, color guard, academics, athletics, marksmanship, and orienteering. Armed basic is marching with rifles, while unarmed basic is standard drill marching. Armed expedition includes marching with rifles, like armed basic, but it also incorporates expert movements, such as spins and throws, with the rifles. Unarmed expedition, similarly, is like unarmed basic drill but with cool hand movements. Color guard features marching in a group of four, with two people holding rifles and two holding flags–normally the United States flag and another flag.

Academics is a competition between schools about military knowledge. The academics include general orders, principles of leadership, ranks, and chain of command.

Athletics is physical competition between schools, which involves students doing a series of runs, push-ups and sit-ups. Marksmanship is using air rifles in precision–in other words, shooting at targets. Orienteering is a competition where you have a compass and a map which you must use to reach certain points within a limited amount of time.

NJROTC also has other activities like fundraisers and community service. Community service and fundraisers include car washes, trash clean-ups–such as our local Dike Road clean-up and beach clean-up–as well as helping in sports events, like football games and swim meets.

The last activity a student can do in NJROTC is Leadership Academy, where three students from the school will be selected to train. The academy starts on June 17th and lasts a week. Students who attend wake up at 5:30 and go to sleep at 10:30, and must complete a physical training and get uniform inspections every day. Near the end of the academy, students participate in an inspection test, a physical fitness test (including a three mile run), and an academic test. Then, the students graduate if they passed all of the test and earn a silver cord for their uniform as a reward.        

 

By: Corey Hazard

 

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