Why Travel Is So Important

We live our lives in a truly connected time; it seems that every day we are learning lessons that show us that in the modern age, humans are more globally connected than at any other point in history— languages can be learned in a matter of months just by opening an app, pictures from virtually any place on Earth can be shared with anybody and everybody, and more of us are learning about other cultures more quickly and easily than ever before. The interest in travel is increasing, but many are still left dreaming of a week lounging under the Indonesian sun or walking on glaciers in Iceland without any catalyst for action, and if more people knew the benefits, other than the stunning photos and experiences, of travel, that would change. I’ve been to eight countries in seventeen years, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my voyages. Here are some of the highlights:

 

 

  • Travel teaches you first-hand how to adapt to (almost) any situation

 

      • The beautiful pictures you see on Instagram only show a small fraction of travel, often hiding the not-so-beautiful trials faced during travel. From losing baggage to getting sick in a country where you’re not fluent in the language, many things can go wrong, but you learn to adapt and problem solve.

 

  • You can get to know other people and cultures for yourself, not just through a lease, textbook, or screen.

 

      • In the age of social media, it’s easy to look at somebody’s profile, acknowledge that they live somewhere cool, and then move on with your life. When you travel, you get to learn what life is like for other people, for the most part, and you begin to appreciate the difference between cultures.

 

  • You lose the -isms (“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain”)

 

    • Travel reveals that, no matter who you are or where you live, we all share cultural universals–a sociological principle that establishes the fact that the human race is more alike than many nowadays seem to think. Humanity is interconnected, and discovering that will open up a sympathetic, and more importantly empathetic, door.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain

 

  • You gain experiences that, while shared with others, are wholly personal

 

      • Your own experiences are just that– your own. When traveling, you get to keep something all for yourself to hold dear in your heart, and to hold on to forever.

 

  • You gain a better appreciation for life

 

      • It’s the little things– the sunrise over the bustling morning market in Marrakech or the crowded faces around flaming embers in Finland– that truly make life beautiful. When you travel, you’re able to find more of those moments in your own daily life, and your normal suddenly becomes vibrant and beautiful.

 

  • You get a break from the humdrum of daily routine.

 

      • Let’s face it: daily routine becomes boring after doing the same things day in and day out. When you travel, you are able to have a great recess from the monotony we tend to get stuck in.

 

  • Life is short, why not live it to the fullest?

 

    • The lifespan of an average American is only 78 years; why not have as many adventures as possible? To explore is to fulfill a rather youthful desire in one’s heart, and to do so brings such a fundamental joy.

 

With all of the lovely things that the world has to offer, why not take advantage of anything you can? Travel isn’t always easily accessible, but it could also be walking on a different road or reading a book from the library about a different country; anybody can travel anywhere they’d like and reap the benefits that it brings. Peace out.

 

By: Aly Sickles

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