Category: opinion

“Birdbox” Review

A new Netflix movie has surfaced and is taking over the Internet. It’s called “Birdbox.” People are raging about this new movie and even coming up with real-life challenges based on things that happen in the movie. Although “Birdbox” is classified as a horror movie, it contains more suspense than a typical horror movie, moving it slightly towards “thriller” territory.

 

“Birdbox” is set five years in the past, where it shows the world–just as normal as it is today–and the main character, Mallory, who is pregnant. Mallory’s sister tells her about an insane mass suicide going on in Russia, but she brushes it off and doesn’t worry. Instead, she decides to simply go about her normal day, which includes a check-up with her OB/GYN. While leaving the hospital, Mallory sees a girl trying to kill herself, and experiences one of the first signs that whatever is happening in Russia is now happening in the U.S. Mallory and her sister hurry home, but on their way, they come across chaos within the streets–it isn’t even safe for them to be on the road. Mallory’s sister abandons her, but thankfully, Mallory, shell-shocked and confused, is helped by a man and woman who bring her into a safe home along with other people. These survivors stay together and come to find out that the only way to survive is to avoid going outside–and that if you have to, you need to keep your eyes covered. The “entity” is outside, and if you look at it, you see your worst fears and end up killing yourself.

 

The movie then goes on about Mallory not only having her child but also adopting another one, and tells the story of how they survive. The movie itself succeeded in getting me hooked onto the storyline, and had me wondering what would happen every minute of the movie, which kept me anxious for what was going to happen next. It had me on the edge of my seat at some points, I didn’t know what was going to happen, and I was worried my favorite character was going to die. However, I also found it a bit all over the place, because it would go back and forth between the present and past what seemed like every few minutes. I also felt like a lot of questions were left unanswered.  I would recommend this movie to people who love a good suspenseful movie and who have maybe seen “A Quiet Place” and really liked it. I would rate this movie an 8 out of 10 overall.

 

By: Rylee Tuzzeo and Cesar Dominguez

Hannah’s (Practical) Guide to Sustainable Fashion

Our clothing says a lot about who we are, but no one wants their clothes to say that they support labor exploitation or contribute to environmental waste. Sustainable fashion is an umbrella term that is used to describe the ethical production and consumption of  clothing garments. The life cycle of a garment is important to consider when it is being classified as sustainable fashion–this includes the garment’s design and uses outside the original intent. Sustainability is an ever-growing trend, and the average consumer is becoming more aware of the dangerous effects that our spending habits can have.

 

The three main types of sustainable fashion are as follows:

  1. Eco-fashion, which refers to the effects clothing has on the environment;
  2. Slow fashion, which refers to increasing the lifespan of clothing and slowing down the fashion seasons; and
  3. Ethical fashion, which refers to the ethical standards surrounding the production of a garment.

 

Many of us have been turned off from the idea of sustainable fashion due to concerns with cost and accessibility, but being ethical about your shopping isn’t as difficult as it seems. I’ve put together a beginner’s guide to sustainable and ethical fashion without limiting your style choices. Here are four ways you can stop contributing to the negative effects of the fashion industry.

 

  1. Care for your clothes
    • The easiest way to start living sustainably is to value and take care of the clothes you already own. Your clothes will last longer with proper maintenance. When you care for the clothing you own, you expand the lifespan of your most beloved outfits, and as a result, you will tend to shop less. The mass production of garments has only contributed to society’s wasteful attitude towards fashion consumption, and neglecting the clothes you already own is exactly what fashion retailers are preying on. Take care of the clothes you have and you can help slow the high consumption rates caused by fast fashion.
  2. Shop less
    • If you only buy pieces that you know for certain that you’ll get a lot of use of and wholeheartedly love, you will be less likely to shop more clothes. As the saying goes, “quality over quantity;” this is another easy way to incorporate sustainability in your daily life with little hassle. Fast fashion tends to have a reduced quality, as brands create clothing quickly and cheaply, trying to adapt to the trends that quickly come and go. Choose clothes made of better materials that you know are not going to fade or shrink after a couple washes. The more durable your clothes are, the less often you’ll have to dispose of or replace them, effectively ending the toxic trend of frivolous consumption.
  3. Buy vintage or second-hand
    • Buying clothing that is vintage or secondhand has become more mainstream thanks to the surge of retro fashion cycling back into society. A simple way to participate is to shop pre-loved fashions; in doing so, the clothes are being recycled and reused, and the linear cycle of production to disposal is slowed down. Thrift stores and consignment stores are a great way to source second-hand clothing and online shops such as Depop and Poshmark allow you to buy and sell your gently used clothing.
  4. Support ethical brands
    • Reject fast fashion and start shopping locally; purchasing pre-worn clothing or clothing from sustainable brands allows you to support independent designers and environmentally conscious efforts rather than directly supporting a fast-fashion company. There are curated vintage brands such as Shop Suki and sustainable brands such as Reformation which repurpose vintage styles and use locally sourced and sustainable materials.

 

With the rising popularity of sustainable fashion, many modern clothing companies are making the switch to ethically produced clothing. Consumers can aid in extending the lifespan of the clothing by reusing, recycling, and repurposing clothing we already own or can easily access. Sustainable living seems like a difficult adjustment, but simple acts–such as the ones mentioned in this article–do a lot; an individual can help change the rate of fashion consumption. Every little bit helps to replace the consumerist fast-fashion habit with an ethical closet that is better for the environment.

 

By: Hannah Tran

“Halloween” Review

Recently, I watched one of the best movies of 2018–a horror movie called “Halloween.” Halloween is a horror movie that is supposed to be a sequel to the first and original “Halloween,” made in 1978. Although there have been 5 other movies produced in the span of 40 years, fans are asked to ignore them all–except for the first one, as the new one is still connected to it. The original “Halloween” is a movie about a man named Michael Myers who killed his oldest sister, Judith, when he was only six, by stabbing her–which led him to be sent away, but he eventually escaped at 21, in search of more people to kill. In fact, Michael murders almost anyone that comes across his path.

 

The new “Halloween” starts with Michael being held in a psych hospital-slash-prison facility. Two reporters want to learn more about Michael, so they go to visit him, only to find that he doesn’t talk, not even when they pull out his famous killing mask to show him. The two reporters are then informed that Michael will be transferred that night to a different facility. After their visit, the two reporters go to Laurie Strode to question her. Laurie Strode is from the original “Halloween,” where Michael killed her three friends when she was in high school and tried to kill her while she was babysitting. The whole story is focused on her search for revenge. Laurie lives in a secluded, high-security house in the middle of the woods, just waiting for him to come and try to kill her again. Later, the viewer learns about Laurie’s family; she has a rough relationship with her daughter and doesn’t see her granddaughter that much. Once the bus for the inmates who are being transported leaves the facility, Laurie is outside watching and has flashbacks that lead her to go to her family for help. The next scene shows that the bus has crashed and everyone inside of it, including Michael, have escaped.
Michael continues his killing spree from 40 years ago, and somehow, he ends up getting his mask back…
The movie then goes off of Michael’s escape and how Laurie protects herself and her family from the famous, scary “boogie man,” Michael Myers.
The movie itself succeeded in scaring me, to the point where I needed to cover one of my eyes to feel safe looking at the screen. However, I also found it a bit overly dramatic and unrealistic in some of the scenes. Overall, though, it was a good scare. It had me on the edge of my seat at some points and I didn’t know what was going to happen. I would recommend this movie to people who love the original “Halloween,” or those who just enjoy a well-made scary and suspenseful movie. I would rate this movie a 7.5 out of 10 compared to the first and other horror films that I have seen.

 

By: Rylee Tuzzeo

The Race to Destruction: Fast Fashion’s Effects on the World and Society

Since the Industrial Revolution in the 1800s, there has been a steady incline in the efficiency of clothing manufacturing, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that clothing companies began to really produce garments with intense speed. Fashion became easily accessible to the public for consumption at lower costs than ever before; the allure of having trendy and fashionable pieces in one’s closet catalyzed more demand for these cheap and fast clothes. Fast forward to 2019, and clothing brands such as H&M, Forever 21, Zara, Charlotte Russe, and TOPSHOP are everywhere and dominate the closets of children and adults alike. Who wouldn’t pass up a $3.90 pair of leggings or a $4 dress? This cycle of the production of “fast-wearing” clothes and even faster consumerism has paved the way for detrimental consequences for the producer, the environment, and the consumer.

 

Cheap labor is the euphemism, in this case, for sweatshop workers who unfortunately do not make enough money to surpass the poverty line–the workers who live heavily-clustered in slums without the basic necessities and resources needed to have a decent quality of life. In the 1990s, the textile industry began moving overseas at an extremely high rate–fewer labor laws overseas would lead to the opportunity to rapidly amass products and cheaply sell them without having to worry about workers’ wages and rights. The sweatshops aren’t safe; “accidental mass killings” aren’t just a tragedy of the early 20th century. They still happen even in the most technologically advanced generation we’ve seen thus far. In 2013, the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing at least 1,138 workers making clothes. In response to this incident, a European-led coalition of unions and allied NGOs (non-governmental organizations) teamed up to work with Bangladeshi labor groups to create a worker safety initiative focused on empowering workers themselves, adopted largely by European firms and led by H&M but also adopted by several major U.S. brands. Even with such a development, the initiative has had some trouble staying afloat, and there is still more that needs to be done. How can we support the abuse and complete disregard of the very people that give us the things we crave most? Textile factories have also been found to be ripe with the foul stench of human trafficking, found even in the United States. Girls and women promised jobs and opportunity come only to be bound to a cycle of abuse and servitude; real people in terrible situations are grossly underpaid, mistreated, taken advantage of, subjected to devastating health problems, and even dying- to make disposable clothing for the “lucky” us, the consumers.

 

This radical mass production creates pollution, and the mass waste caused by consumers carelessly tossing old garments contributes to utter environmental chaos. During the farming process for cotton, the pesticides that are used are being linked to cancer and birth defects in farmers’ children in the Punjab region of India, as well as contributing to the development of a brain tumor in the case of one Texan farmer. The production of cotton, though only making up “2.4 percent of the world’s crops… is responsible for 24 percent of global insecticide sales and 11 percent of global pesticide sales,” as well as the immense consumption of freshwater–one t-shirt can take up to 2,700 liters of water to make–and the facts don’t stop there. American clothing waste, nearly 3.8 billion pounds annually, ends up in landfills, which amounts to nearly 80 pounds of textile per American citizen–which seems practically unimaginable. In addition, over 80 billion pieces of clothing are purchased each year, mostly by Americans, even though the clothing was made in outsourced low-income countries such as China and Bangladesh. The factory workers’ subjection to environmentally unstable working and living situations is appalling, yet Americans can’t seem to decrease their demand for trendy and cheap clothing. Textile waste begets the production of methane during decomposition and the dyes and chemicals used to color and create the textiles could sink into the soil; whole communities and agricultural systems are crumbling due to mass production of fast fashion.

 

As a modern consumer, there seems to be something extremely satisfying about inserting a card into a chip reader and walking out of a store with a new purchase. With fast-fashion retailers churning out new trends and styles many more times a year than in the high-fashion realm–either as a continuous release or around 12 seasons for fast-fashion retailers versus 2 seasons for typical high fashion–buyers are armed with the caveat that they must shop then and there in order to stay up-to-date with the most current style. Having this feeling of staying on top of “the game” tends to bring an immense feeling of instant gratification when compulsory shopping, a feeling that is catalyzed with each swipe or chip read, and to keep feeling that instant gratification, we buy. This cycle can very easily turn into an addiction with us giving immense support and money to the factories and fast-fashion companies.

 

As the public eyes turn more towards to atrocities associated with fast fashion production and retail, hopefully, change will come. Remove fast fashion from your spending habits, buy second-hand clothes, boycott the fast fashion industry, or even just learn about and advocate for sustainable clothing.

 

Sources:

Ross, Robert J.S. “The High Toll of Fast Fashion.” Dissent Magazine, http://www.dissentmagazine.org/blog/the-true-cost-review-fast-fashion-rana-plaza-accord.

Morgan, Andrew, director. The True Cost. 2015.

Bailey, Carolyn. “Slow Down: Fast Fashion Has Harmful Effects.” Trusted Clothes, 10 Sept. 2016, http://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/2016/02/09/slow-down-fast-fashion-has-harmful-effects/.

“The Impact of a Cotton T-Shirt.” WWF, World Wildlife Fund, 16 Jan. 2013, http://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/the-impact-of-a-cotton-t-shirt.

Bick, Rachel, et al. “The Global Environmental Injustice of Fast Fashion.” Environmental Health, vol. 17, no. 1, 2018, doi:10.1186/s12940-018-0433-7.

 

To learn more, watch The True Cost on Netflix.

 

By: Aly Sickles

 

Why Travel Is So Important

We live our lives in a truly connected time; it seems that every day we are learning lessons that show us that in the modern age, humans are more globally connected than at any other point in history— languages can be learned in a matter of months just by opening an app, pictures from virtually any place on Earth can be shared with anybody and everybody, and more of us are learning about other cultures more quickly and easily than ever before. The interest in travel is increasing, but many are still left dreaming of a week lounging under the Indonesian sun or walking on glaciers in Iceland without any catalyst for action, and if more people knew the benefits, other than the stunning photos and experiences, of travel, that would change. I’ve been to eight countries in seventeen years, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my voyages. Here are some of the highlights:

 

 

  • Travel teaches you first-hand how to adapt to (almost) any situation

 

      • The beautiful pictures you see on Instagram only show a small fraction of travel, often hiding the not-so-beautiful trials faced during travel. From losing baggage to getting sick in a country where you’re not fluent in the language, many things can go wrong, but you learn to adapt and problem solve.

 

  • You can get to know other people and cultures for yourself, not just through a lease, textbook, or screen.

 

      • In the age of social media, it’s easy to look at somebody’s profile, acknowledge that they live somewhere cool, and then move on with your life. When you travel, you get to learn what life is like for other people, for the most part, and you begin to appreciate the difference between cultures.

 

  • You lose the -isms (“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain”)

 

    • Travel reveals that, no matter who you are or where you live, we all share cultural universals–a sociological principle that establishes the fact that the human race is more alike than many nowadays seem to think. Humanity is interconnected, and discovering that will open up a sympathetic, and more importantly empathetic, door.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain

 

  • You gain experiences that, while shared with others, are wholly personal

 

      • Your own experiences are just that– your own. When traveling, you get to keep something all for yourself to hold dear in your heart, and to hold on to forever.

 

  • You gain a better appreciation for life

 

      • It’s the little things– the sunrise over the bustling morning market in Marrakech or the crowded faces around flaming embers in Finland– that truly make life beautiful. When you travel, you’re able to find more of those moments in your own daily life, and your normal suddenly becomes vibrant and beautiful.

 

  • You get a break from the humdrum of daily routine.

 

      • Let’s face it: daily routine becomes boring after doing the same things day in and day out. When you travel, you are able to have a great recess from the monotony we tend to get stuck in.

 

  • Life is short, why not live it to the fullest?

 

    • The lifespan of an average American is only 78 years; why not have as many adventures as possible? To explore is to fulfill a rather youthful desire in one’s heart, and to do so brings such a fundamental joy.

 

With all of the lovely things that the world has to offer, why not take advantage of anything you can? Travel isn’t always easily accessible, but it could also be walking on a different road or reading a book from the library about a different country; anybody can travel anywhere they’d like and reap the benefits that it brings. Peace out.

 

By: Aly Sickles

“Smallfoot” Movie Review

Are you looking for a new animated movie to enjoy with your family? One that is family friendly and shares a valuable lesson? Well, you’re in luck! The new animated movie “Smallfoot” has just hit the theaters, and everyone you know is either talking about it or about to be. The cast includes famous actors and actresses like Zendaya Coleman, Lebron James, Channing Tatum, and James Cordon! You don’t want to miss out on this phenomenal cast. Another reason to watch the movie is that it carries an important lesson that anyone can learn from–it teaches viewers to never judge others by their appearance and to trust the people around you. This movie is just as entertaining for adults as it is for young children. The soundtrack has catchy songs, the adventure will keep everyone wanting more, and the movie’s stellar comedy will make anyone laugh.  The movie starts off introducing us to a civilization of Yetis who believe that humans are dangerous. It all starts with a Yeti known as Migo–while adventuring, he notices a human-sized shoe and footprints on the floor. Once he notices the strange footprint, he goes home, triumphantly chanting that he has found a “smallfoot.” Everyone dismisses his excitement and considers him to be delusional. However, Migo’s friends trust him and believe that there is another “creature” other than a Yeti. The adventurous band of friends decide to search for the mysterious human to prove that they are real.

 

The Yetis start by going separate ways to find the human and, eventually, come across many clues. Migo and Meechee head far away from their home into the unknown and soon find a human store. Eventually, a human appears and Migo attempts to talk to the young man. Much to his dismay, though, the human can’t understand what the Yeti is saying. Communication between the two doesn’t work very well since their languages are both different. On the other hand, the young human, played by James Corden, is shocked by the event. The movie soon reveals to the audience that he has studied Yetis his whole life. Despite the initial shock, the two begin to admire each others’ presences; the human begins to take pictures of the Yeti while vlogging his unexpected experience. Migo is confused by the young man’s actions, but continues to attempt to communicate with the man. James is taken aback by the Yeti’s insistence and believes that the creature is starting to threatening him. He suddenly faints from fear, and the Yeti cheerfully picks up the human to show off to the other Yetis back home. In conclusion, “Smallfoot” is a fun, feel-good movie that will engage the audience from the start to end. Don’t forget to hit the theaters when you have a chance! You don’t want to miss this amazing movie!

 

By: Aly Sickles

 

Malaysia Travel Review

Malaysia is often known as the melting pot of Asia; various ethnic groups (from an assortment of religious groups in the Malays to Indians and Chinese)  live there with the native Dayaks. The result of this mixture of cultures is an astounding array of cuisine, festivals, experiences, and people to meet. Aside from the cultural beauty, Malaysia is known for its idyllic natural beauty in the beaches, diverse animal species, equatorial national parks, ancient rainforests, and islands. Here is your guide to travelling the beautiful Malaysia (on the cheap):

 

Number 1 - City of Penang.jpg

  1. The City of Penang

Penang is the lesser-known foodie capital of both Asia and the world. Because of the ethnic diversity, cheap food, and authentic cooking traditions, the gastronomic scene in this city is nothing less than eye-opening and astounding. Street food is an integral part of Asian cuisine, and Penang does it best. From Georgetown’s Chinatown to its Little India, walking the streets of Penang offers a sensory overload of fresh spices and aromatic dishes being served. Start at the waterfront, ready to walk and eat your heart out, then go to Gurney Drive to continue around the city square. You can get anything from freshly-cooked meat to biryani, from chili dishes to Hainan Chicken Rice. One of the most iconic dishes of Malaysia is Char Koay Teow, a noodle dish that evolved in the Guangdong province in China and combines prawns stir-fried with flat noodles, soy and chili sauces, blood cockles, bean sprouts, and often other proteins like egg or chicken.

(Information taken from a great article on Matador: https://matadornetwork.com/read/penang-malaysia-food/)

 

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  1. Batu Caves

Located in Selangor, the Batu Caves are the site of a Hindu temple and a large shrine of the Hindu God (Brahman), in addition to the three caves. If you like animals, monkeys are everywhere here, but make sure to guard your personal belongings, as they’re known to steal. The limestone on the caves is also perfect for rock-climbing enthusiasts. The official tour of the caves is around $50, but you can explore on your own for as little as $5– a strategy recommended more from various attendee reviews. Take a gander at some of the most beautiful forms of geological growth!

 

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  1.  Langkawi Sky Cab

If the “steepest cable-car trip in the world” title isn’t enough for you,  the picturesque views of the stunning beaches and tropical forests surely will be. The Langkawi Sky Cab offers an astounding view for $17 per adult ticket–which may seem a little pricey, but the experience is priceless. It’s a cross between a closed Ferris wheel and a ski-lift (or vernacular), which easily makes it easy to feel on top of the world.

(http://www.panoramalangkawi.com/skycab/)

 

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  1. Teman Negara Hike

While being in the major cities is fun and upbeat, nothing beats being out in nature, and with the Teman Negara Hiking Trails, it’s even easier to feel tranquility in the wraps of a beautiful rainforest– the oldest one in the world, that is. There are a myriad of trail options, from one that lasts an hour to one for nearly 7 days. You can even explore the caves or do their famous “canopy-walk” suspended among the tall trees and magnificent birds.

(Learn more at http://www.tamannegaratravel.com/taman-negara-trails-trek/)

 

Number 5 - Sepilok Orangutan Rehab Center.jpg

  1. Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre

$7 can take you far in Malaysia, but nothing might be as spectacular as the orangutan rehabilitation centre in the Sabah District of North Borneo in Malaysia. The centre primarily rehabilitates young orangutans orphaned as a result of illegal logging and deforestation or illegally being traded and kept as pets, and visitors can have a chance to see the renewal of life for these magnificent animals. Whether zoology is one of your interests or not, this experience is an unforgettable one.

(Visit their website at https://www.orangutan-appeal.org.uk/about-us/sepilok-orangutan-rehabilitation-centre)

 

By: Ally Sickles

“Riverdale” Review

Over the past year, a new television show has risen to popularity, inundating the Internet with hashtags, gifs and chatter surrounding it. It’s a drama-based show about teenaged high school students called Riverdale, named for the small town of Riverdale where it takes place. The show begins with the backgrounds of a few characters and of the town itself. Riverdale appears to be a quiet town, but it has a reputation for seeming suspicious, or even a little spooky. The town of Riverdale is separated into two parts; the south side and the suburban side. The south side is characterized as a gang whose members are known as the “Serpents”. They wear black leather jackets with snakes (also known as serpents) on the back, along with the words “South Serpents” to display who they are and what they represent. The Serpents live in rougher parts, and most of their lives have revolved around drugs and money. The suburban side, however, is a family friendly community with good schools, and is displayed as a town where nothing dramatic or disturbing happens….or so the residents had believed. The main characters soon find themselves caught in lies, an odd love triangle, drama, and even danger.

 
Once Riverdale was released onto Netflix, many teens were so hooked that they couldn’t not binge watch the show! It has created a whole new type of suspense, as it revolves around teens who step up and become detectives in order to solve mysteries and search for the hidden truth. But sometimes, the truth they find is not the truth that they wish to discover. Riverdale is a great show for people who love to watch suspenseful, dramatic and high school-based movies. It makes you feel attached to the show, almost as if you are there with the characters, and you get so involved that you try to solve the mysteries yourself. You will even catch yourself trying to find some hidden clues. Riverdale only has two released seasons on Netflix so far, however, I highly recommend watching it–you won’t regret it and it will leave you wanting more! Overall, I would have to rate the show an 8/10.

 

By: Rylee Tuzzeo

The Kavanaugh Circus

Written by Jaron Bullington, October 4th, 2018

This article is not meant to say that Doctor Ford or Kavanagh are guilty, or completely innocent, but instead bring light to the issue at hand- the ignorance of the due process of law.

For many weeks, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh has been in the light of the mass media. Headlines upon headlines storm every person’s social media and newsfeeds, and it is one of the most heated subjects of this year. Why, though, you may ask, has Kavanaugh been at the center of this media attack? He was accused of rape and sexual assault, by Doctor Christine Blasey Ford.

Kavanaugh has been labeled many things these past few weeks- rapist, misogynist, etc.- but why is he labeled this way? Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, right? The fact of the matter is that there has been absolutely no corroborating evidence to confirm Ford’s original claim, something crucial to determining if Kavanaugh is guilty of said crime. The basic feature of U.S. law is the idea of due process, or the idea of an accused person being innocent until proven guilty in the court of law. It seems that this case, the case of Kavanaugh v. Ford, has had many people abandon this idea. Sparks have been flying in the #MeToo movement, and throughout the left, some outright saying or implying that Kavanaugh is indeed guilty. It is true, and undeniable that Doctor Ford’s statement in the Senate judiciary committee was heart wrenching, it felt meaningful. But, as is law, guiltiness is not determined by how someone acts or feels, instead, it is determined by cold, hard evidence. Doctor Ford does not have it.

There are many that say to “Believe the Victim”, or in this case, “Believe Doctor Ford”. This is a dangerous thing, and many do not realize why. If we inherently say that the accuser is a victim, before even determining if the accused is guilty, there is a problem. This ignores basic law, again, due process. The court should decide whether the accused is guilty, and then we can start to talk about the accused. What this creates is a sort of “guilty until proven innocent” culture, where the “victim” has bias toward them, not due to substantial evidence, but because they said that they were victimized.

This also hurts those that are victims of actual rape, and sexual assault. It demeans their claim, because of others who were trusted or “believed” but were proven wrong in the court of law. It is a “the boy who cried wolf” sort of situation; if so many people say that they were victimized by a person, but proven wrong in the court, other people who may have actually been victimized might not be trusted.

Overall, the Kavanaugh hearing has been an absolute circus; a parade. A total ignorance of the law. Our elected officials act like children in a daycare- arguing, screaming, and running away. If there’s one thing to take out of this (other than to trust in the due process of law), it is the fact that we, as the next generation, need to get out and vote.

“The Nun” Movie Review

Over the past weekend, I watched “The Nun,” a new movie that just released in the movie theaters September 6th. “The Nun” is a horror movie that ties in to the popular horror movie “The Conjuring;” it explains the story of “The Conjuring” and gives out answers towards the end that had been left unanswered at the end of “The Conjuring.”

 

“The Nun” is about an investigation within an abbey, a building occupied by a community of nuns, where a nun killed herself; the events begin when a priest, along with a nun, appear on the scene to find out what is going on. Little do they know, however, that there are many secrets they are going to discover. The movie opens with a young nun running for her life before she sacrifices her life in her abbey. A local man named Frenchie, who lives in the village, comes across the dead body, and the word soon gets out. A priest, Father Burke, is contacted by a church, and he goes with several other priests to investigate the scene. They are accompanied by Frenchie and a young nun named Irene, who has not completed her final vows. Frenchie, who found the body, leads both Father Burke and Sister Irene to the abbey. When they arrive, they immediately begin to feel weird vibes about the abbey and what is going on in it. The abbey is old, run down, and completely empty, with darkness all over–the perfect setting for a horror movie. The first person they come across looks suspicious and is covered head to toe in a black cloak, and she then assigns them where to stay and sleep. The first day they arrive, weird things begin to happen, and that is only the beginning.

 

The movie itself succeeding in scaring me to the point where I needed to cover one of my eyes and squint to look back at the screen. Overall, it was a good scare; however, I found it a bit odd due to some of the scenes. I would recommend this movie to people who love a good scare, especially the kind that pops out of nowhere, and people who love suspenseful movies. I would rate this movie a 6/10 compared to other horror films that I have watched.

 

By: Madison Moore