Tag: Features

Hannah’s (Practical) Guide to Sustainable Fashion

Our clothing says a lot about who we are, but no one wants their clothes to say that they support labor exploitation or contribute to environmental waste. Sustainable fashion is an umbrella term that is used to describe the ethical production and consumption of  clothing garments. The life cycle of a garment is important to consider when it is being classified as sustainable fashion–this includes the garment’s design and uses outside the original intent. Sustainability is an ever-growing trend, and the average consumer is becoming more aware of the dangerous effects that our spending habits can have.

 

The three main types of sustainable fashion are as follows:

  1. Eco-fashion, which refers to the effects clothing has on the environment;
  2. Slow fashion, which refers to increasing the lifespan of clothing and slowing down the fashion seasons; and
  3. Ethical fashion, which refers to the ethical standards surrounding the production of a garment.

 

Many of us have been turned off from the idea of sustainable fashion due to concerns with cost and accessibility, but being ethical about your shopping isn’t as difficult as it seems. I’ve put together a beginner’s guide to sustainable and ethical fashion without limiting your style choices. Here are four ways you can stop contributing to the negative effects of the fashion industry.

 

  1. Care for your clothes
    • The easiest way to start living sustainably is to value and take care of the clothes you already own. Your clothes will last longer with proper maintenance. When you care for the clothing you own, you expand the lifespan of your most beloved outfits, and as a result, you will tend to shop less. The mass production of garments has only contributed to society’s wasteful attitude towards fashion consumption, and neglecting the clothes you already own is exactly what fashion retailers are preying on. Take care of the clothes you have and you can help slow the high consumption rates caused by fast fashion.
  2. Shop less
    • If you only buy pieces that you know for certain that you’ll get a lot of use of and wholeheartedly love, you will be less likely to shop more clothes. As the saying goes, “quality over quantity;” this is another easy way to incorporate sustainability in your daily life with little hassle. Fast fashion tends to have a reduced quality, as brands create clothing quickly and cheaply, trying to adapt to the trends that quickly come and go. Choose clothes made of better materials that you know are not going to fade or shrink after a couple washes. The more durable your clothes are, the less often you’ll have to dispose of or replace them, effectively ending the toxic trend of frivolous consumption.
  3. Buy vintage or second-hand
    • Buying clothing that is vintage or secondhand has become more mainstream thanks to the surge of retro fashion cycling back into society. A simple way to participate is to shop pre-loved fashions; in doing so, the clothes are being recycled and reused, and the linear cycle of production to disposal is slowed down. Thrift stores and consignment stores are a great way to source second-hand clothing and online shops such as Depop and Poshmark allow you to buy and sell your gently used clothing.
  4. Support ethical brands
    • Reject fast fashion and start shopping locally; purchasing pre-worn clothing or clothing from sustainable brands allows you to support independent designers and environmentally conscious efforts rather than directly supporting a fast-fashion company. There are curated vintage brands such as Shop Suki and sustainable brands such as Reformation which repurpose vintage styles and use locally sourced and sustainable materials.

 

With the rising popularity of sustainable fashion, many modern clothing companies are making the switch to ethically produced clothing. Consumers can aid in extending the lifespan of the clothing by reusing, recycling, and repurposing clothing we already own or can easily access. Sustainable living seems like a difficult adjustment, but simple acts–such as the ones mentioned in this article–do a lot; an individual can help change the rate of fashion consumption. Every little bit helps to replace the consumerist fast-fashion habit with an ethical closet that is better for the environment.

 

By: Hannah Tran

Why Travel Is So Important

We live our lives in a truly connected time; it seems that every day we are learning lessons that show us that in the modern age, humans are more globally connected than at any other point in history— languages can be learned in a matter of months just by opening an app, pictures from virtually any place on Earth can be shared with anybody and everybody, and more of us are learning about other cultures more quickly and easily than ever before. The interest in travel is increasing, but many are still left dreaming of a week lounging under the Indonesian sun or walking on glaciers in Iceland without any catalyst for action, and if more people knew the benefits, other than the stunning photos and experiences, of travel, that would change. I’ve been to eight countries in seventeen years, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my voyages. Here are some of the highlights:

 

 

  • Travel teaches you first-hand how to adapt to (almost) any situation

 

      • The beautiful pictures you see on Instagram only show a small fraction of travel, often hiding the not-so-beautiful trials faced during travel. From losing baggage to getting sick in a country where you’re not fluent in the language, many things can go wrong, but you learn to adapt and problem solve.

 

  • You can get to know other people and cultures for yourself, not just through a lease, textbook, or screen.

 

      • In the age of social media, it’s easy to look at somebody’s profile, acknowledge that they live somewhere cool, and then move on with your life. When you travel, you get to learn what life is like for other people, for the most part, and you begin to appreciate the difference between cultures.

 

  • You lose the -isms (“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain”)

 

    • Travel reveals that, no matter who you are or where you live, we all share cultural universals–a sociological principle that establishes the fact that the human race is more alike than many nowadays seem to think. Humanity is interconnected, and discovering that will open up a sympathetic, and more importantly empathetic, door.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain

 

  • You gain experiences that, while shared with others, are wholly personal

 

      • Your own experiences are just that– your own. When traveling, you get to keep something all for yourself to hold dear in your heart, and to hold on to forever.

 

  • You gain a better appreciation for life

 

      • It’s the little things– the sunrise over the bustling morning market in Marrakech or the crowded faces around flaming embers in Finland– that truly make life beautiful. When you travel, you’re able to find more of those moments in your own daily life, and your normal suddenly becomes vibrant and beautiful.

 

  • You get a break from the humdrum of daily routine.

 

      • Let’s face it: daily routine becomes boring after doing the same things day in and day out. When you travel, you are able to have a great recess from the monotony we tend to get stuck in.

 

  • Life is short, why not live it to the fullest?

 

    • The lifespan of an average American is only 78 years; why not have as many adventures as possible? To explore is to fulfill a rather youthful desire in one’s heart, and to do so brings such a fundamental joy.

 

With all of the lovely things that the world has to offer, why not take advantage of anything you can? Travel isn’t always easily accessible, but it could also be walking on a different road or reading a book from the library about a different country; anybody can travel anywhere they’d like and reap the benefits that it brings. Peace out.

 

By: Aly Sickles

Zodiac: Libra Season

September 23rd marks the beginning of the lovely Libra season. If you didn’t know, Libra is the 7th sign falling on the zodiac, after Virgo and before Scorpio. “Libra season” refers to the end of September and beginning of October.

Libras are balanced, fair, and social signs. They’re ruled by Venus, the planet of love. Libras often avoid conflicts, violence, and drama. Venus was the Roman goddess of love, which explains why Libras are so great in relationships. It also makes it clear to see that Libras are lovers, not fighters. Because we are currently under the influence of Libra, we have entered the 7th house of relationships, and it’s a great time to rekindle old sparks you wish to make flames again.

Libras have a strong sense of right and wrong because they can see almost every side of every situation, though they are indecisive. They are all about pleasing others, but do not do as much for themselves. They’re easily influenced by other people, making them easy targets for manipulation, but they do know how to stand up for themselves. Libras are one of the best signs to be around due to their ability to make anything fun, their drive to do what they please, their charismatic attitudes, and their seeming inability to be boring.

All zodiac signs have their element, and Libra’s is air. Other air signs include Gemini and Aquarius. Air signs are seen as people who are able to understand abstract reasoning; they’re great at analyzing and understanding others’ opinions without judgement. These signs are also about communication. They’re great at getting the word out, which drives both their perception and curiosity. They can be as swift as a summer breeze or can come at you like the winds of a hurricane, it depends how you catch them.

Some famous Libras: Kim Kardashian, Bruno Mars, Matt Damon, Will Smith, and Ryan Reynolds.

If you would like to read more about your zodiac, find out your horoscope of the day, or learn more about other signs, follow the link!

https://www.tarot.com/astrology/zodiac/libra

 

By: Madison Moore