Tag: hannah

Hannah’s (Practical) Guide to Sustainable Fashion

Our clothing says a lot about who we are, but no one wants their clothes to say that they support labor exploitation or contribute to environmental waste. Sustainable fashion is an umbrella term that is used to describe the ethical production and consumption of  clothing garments. The life cycle of a garment is important to consider when it is being classified as sustainable fashion–this includes the garment’s design and uses outside the original intent. Sustainability is an ever-growing trend, and the average consumer is becoming more aware of the dangerous effects that our spending habits can have.

 

The three main types of sustainable fashion are as follows:

  1. Eco-fashion, which refers to the effects clothing has on the environment;
  2. Slow fashion, which refers to increasing the lifespan of clothing and slowing down the fashion seasons; and
  3. Ethical fashion, which refers to the ethical standards surrounding the production of a garment.

 

Many of us have been turned off from the idea of sustainable fashion due to concerns with cost and accessibility, but being ethical about your shopping isn’t as difficult as it seems. I’ve put together a beginner’s guide to sustainable and ethical fashion without limiting your style choices. Here are four ways you can stop contributing to the negative effects of the fashion industry.

 

  1. Care for your clothes
    • The easiest way to start living sustainably is to value and take care of the clothes you already own. Your clothes will last longer with proper maintenance. When you care for the clothing you own, you expand the lifespan of your most beloved outfits, and as a result, you will tend to shop less. The mass production of garments has only contributed to society’s wasteful attitude towards fashion consumption, and neglecting the clothes you already own is exactly what fashion retailers are preying on. Take care of the clothes you have and you can help slow the high consumption rates caused by fast fashion.
  2. Shop less
    • If you only buy pieces that you know for certain that you’ll get a lot of use of and wholeheartedly love, you will be less likely to shop more clothes. As the saying goes, “quality over quantity;” this is another easy way to incorporate sustainability in your daily life with little hassle. Fast fashion tends to have a reduced quality, as brands create clothing quickly and cheaply, trying to adapt to the trends that quickly come and go. Choose clothes made of better materials that you know are not going to fade or shrink after a couple washes. The more durable your clothes are, the less often you’ll have to dispose of or replace them, effectively ending the toxic trend of frivolous consumption.
  3. Buy vintage or second-hand
    • Buying clothing that is vintage or secondhand has become more mainstream thanks to the surge of retro fashion cycling back into society. A simple way to participate is to shop pre-loved fashions; in doing so, the clothes are being recycled and reused, and the linear cycle of production to disposal is slowed down. Thrift stores and consignment stores are a great way to source second-hand clothing and online shops such as Depop and Poshmark allow you to buy and sell your gently used clothing.
  4. Support ethical brands
    • Reject fast fashion and start shopping locally; purchasing pre-worn clothing or clothing from sustainable brands allows you to support independent designers and environmentally conscious efforts rather than directly supporting a fast-fashion company. There are curated vintage brands such as Shop Suki and sustainable brands such as Reformation which repurpose vintage styles and use locally sourced and sustainable materials.

 

With the rising popularity of sustainable fashion, many modern clothing companies are making the switch to ethically produced clothing. Consumers can aid in extending the lifespan of the clothing by reusing, recycling, and repurposing clothing we already own or can easily access. Sustainable living seems like a difficult adjustment, but simple acts–such as the ones mentioned in this article–do a lot; an individual can help change the rate of fashion consumption. Every little bit helps to replace the consumerist fast-fashion habit with an ethical closet that is better for the environment.

 

By: Hannah Tran

About Asian Club

Asian Club is an organization at Lake Howell that aims to educate the student body about Asian culture and society. As Asian culture is mostly overlooked in pop-culture and western society, this club attempts to showcase Asian countries and their culture. The current president is Hannah Tran, a senior at Lake Howell, and the sponsor is Mr. Agagnina. Meetings are held the third Tuesday of every month, in room 1-232, with rare exceptions.

 

Each month will represent a different country; for example, October was Thailand and November was the Philippines. We will enjoy cuisine from that month’s selected country as we discuss their history and the current events of the country. Our goal is to shine a light on Asian culture in a way where high school students will be able to enjoy it and interact with the culture. Asian club tries to immerse students into Asian society through discussions and cuisine; as most members consider themselves as Asian-Americans, this club acts as a safe space to discuss current events and politics with one another. It serves as a great way to learn more about Asia than you would in a normal class setting.

 

If you want to get more information, you can join the remind for Asian Club by texting “@lhhsac” to 81010 to stay updated on upcoming meetings and events for Asian Club. We will be sharing the date for the next meeting soon! Dues are $15 (including the shirt) and $10 (not including the shirt). Seniors must have paid dues and the requirement for meetings is at least one meeting attended in every quarter in order to receive a cord. New members are welcome at any time; Asian Club is open to every student at Lake Howell regardless of race. Asian Club is truly a rewarding experience and it is highly recommended that you join! Hope to see everyone at the next meeting!

By: Hannah Tran

Hannah’s HHN Review!

Universal Studios’ Halloween Horror Nights is a once-a-year event that garners tons of excitement from die-hard fans of both horror and Universal! The various haunted houses and scare-zones are dripping with nostalgia and creativity that cannot be missed; the sheer love of this event from the designers and actors to the fans and community can be felt with every step through the park. The animation for this year’s event was especially great because of the announcement of the Stranger Things haunted house, based off of the increasingly popular Netflix show. This year is easily Universal’s most ambitious event, with record-breaking amounts of mazes offered and “scareactors” performing. The houses all have a few things in common that make this event so memorable: strong atmospheres, great production, and well-timed scares. This year’s event is one of their best yet, and it’d be a mistake not to go to Halloween Horror Nights 2018. The houses this year were all impressive and done brilliantly; however, ranking the houses comes down to personal preference. Here is my ranking of the houses from least favorite to most favorite. 

 

Scary Tales: Deadly Ever After

This was my least favorite house from this year (which was disappointing, because I had high hopes for it this year). The stories were hard to distinguish, and although the premise was “twisted” traditional fairy tales, the transitions from scene to scene and the sets were confusing and muddled together. The inclusion of The Wizard of Oz was entertaining, and the opening of the house had a complete story line of a cursed childhood tale; the rest of the house, though, was underwhelming, even with the aerial scareactors and the use of smells.

 

Dead Exposure: Patient Zero

This might be one of the most polarizing houses thus far; on the one hand, some people love this house and are genuinely scared by it, but there are also those who hate this house and didn’t find it scary at all. I happen to fall into the category of hating it, which is why it’s ranked as one of my least favorite houses. This is partly because I didn’t understand the storyline–even with going through the house several time–and because the lights gave away the scares, so I wasn’t surprised when a scareactor jumped out. It aimed to disorient your senses with lack of lights and implement scares timed with periods of darkness. The design was too simplistic to accommodate the strobe lights and, overall, I think this house relied too heavily on the lighting rather than the actual house itself.

 

The Horrors of Blumhouse

This combination of “Happy Death Day” and “The First Purge” was ultimately disappointing because the stories were unrelated and executed inconsistently. The scares were repetitive, which follows the premise of “Happy Death Day” rather well. This house was disorienting due to the delivery of the same types of scares repeatedly and the actual design of the house; however, those same qualities helped immerse me into the “Happy Death Day” film. Overall, the house seemed to focus too much on “Happy Death Day” and not enough on “The First Purge.” This was one of the least impressive houses of this year’sdfafjvhcfajklhSDkhgDAjhgdaghkSghkXbhXCvgjXZvjhczvbXVZchXAFbhkXCZVJH line up.

 

Stranger Things

Undoubtedly the most highly-anticipated house this year was the Stranger Things house. The popularity of this franchise has exponentially increased in the last two years and has gained a major presence in our everyday lives; the amount of people that crowded to this house every single night of Halloween Horror Nights serves as evidence that this house is one of the most popular. Although it wasn’t my favorite house, it did manage to cover the major scenes of the first season with stunning production designs and a richly detailed soundstage that made it seem like you were in the Upside Down (an alternate reality from the TV series, for the uninformed). The scareactors were hard to distinguish from the actual characters, the Demogorgon was done remarkably well, and the soundstage was used effectively. The downfalls of this house are firstly the use of strobe lights–which, in my opinion, take away from the effectiveness of the scares and sets because they can impair your vision–and secondly the source material, which doesn’t allow for as much horror as some of the other properties.

 

Seeds of Extinction

This house contained some of the most beautiful interior design and integrated the scareactors into the scenes flawlessly. The set dressing of this maze was executed flawlessly, and it added to the overall experience; because of the plant costumes, the scareactors were able to blend in with their surroundings, essentially hiding in plain sight so they could scare you when you least expected it. This maze had some of the most well-crafted haunts and the concept of this house was truly memorable. The use of effects, such as rain and wind, helped make this an intense maze filled with hidden references to other Halloween Horror Nights events and detailed set pieces.

 

Slaughter Sinema

The balance of humor and scares makes this one of the more enjoyable houses of the year. In terms of houses which are intended to be funny, it’s probably the best scare house Halloween Horror Nights has ever done. The structure of this house allowed for the maze to flow effortlessly even though it switched from flick to flick. Using movie posters for the next scene was an effective way to differentiate one section from the next. The 1980’s style of monster movies showed the creativity of the designers and the fun they had creating this house; the scenes were the right balance between amusing and gory. The concept and the execution of this house did nothing but add to the overall experience with a hilarious queue video and entrance design.

 

Trick ‘r Treat

This maze is breathtaking; the amount of attention and care that this house received is obvious in their execution of the scenes and scares. From the initial haunted house façade to the grand finale, this house was so detailed and engrossing, I didn’t want the experience to end. The house manages to tell the story of the 2009 film that it’s based on without being an exact replica. The fact that Sam, the face of Trick ‘r Treat, was to be a dummy some nights and a real scareactor on other nights made me want to keep visiting this house. It was organized in a way that showcased the chapters of the plot and transitioned with simple black box scares that allowed the house to flow effortlessly.

 

Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers

The return of Michael Myers is always welcome at Halloween Horror Nights; this year is the third year that he appeared at this event. Every year, this house is adored by fans of the franchise and the Horror Nights community as a whole. This was one of my favorite houses from this year’s roster; the energy in this house was upbeat and put me in a great mood. The scareactors portraying Michael Myers were incredibly interactive and it was clear that they enjoyed their roles. The delivery of the scares was perfectly timed, and the sheer amount of scareactors, including Mr. Myers and a ton of other characters, kept you on your toes. While the Michael Myers jump scares are repeated heavily, they are integral to the house–it would not be Halloween Horror Nights without Mr. Myers coming at you with a knife.

 

Carnival Graveyard: Rust in Pieces

The Carnival Graveyard house was one of the most interactive houses this year, with its multiple guest-activated triggers and two-story design. This house managed to mix fun and fear together to make a memorable experience. The scares in this house are unusual, which differentiated it from most Horror Nights houses. One of the selling points of this house is its scenic design–the set designs and costumes did a great job of capturing my imagination. The rusted rides and decaying decorations added to the eeriness of this house, especially with some of the scares being more subtle. The attention to detail in this house was heartwarming; if you’re a big fan of Halloween Horror Nights, there were more than a few nods to previous years and Universal’s history hidden in this house.

 

Poltergeist

This is my favorite house; it is unrivaled in terms of the storyline, the aesthetics, and the special effects. Supernatural and paranormal scenes are notoriously difficult to recreate, but the designers managed to create a story that was realistic without being gimmicky or cheesy. The maze features many iconic characters and scenes and, in my opinion, was one of the strongest houses this year. The designers somehow managed to create a tense atmosphere while simultaneously immersing guests into the classic plot of the movie. This house has the most complete storyline and stays true to the movie; it utilizes puppets, air bursts, and roof designs to fully encapsulate the classic 1982 film. The execution of this house is flawless and sets it apart from your typical haunted house.

 

By: Hannah Tran