Tag: reviews

“Birdbox” Review

A new Netflix movie has surfaced and is taking over the Internet. It’s called “Birdbox.” People are raging about this new movie and even coming up with real-life challenges based on things that happen in the movie. Although “Birdbox” is classified as a horror movie, it contains more suspense than a typical horror movie, moving it slightly towards “thriller” territory.

 

“Birdbox” is set five years in the past, where it shows the world–just as normal as it is today–and the main character, Mallory, who is pregnant. Mallory’s sister tells her about an insane mass suicide going on in Russia, but she brushes it off and doesn’t worry. Instead, she decides to simply go about her normal day, which includes a check-up with her OB/GYN. While leaving the hospital, Mallory sees a girl trying to kill herself, and experiences one of the first signs that whatever is happening in Russia is now happening in the U.S. Mallory and her sister hurry home, but on their way, they come across chaos within the streets–it isn’t even safe for them to be on the road. Mallory’s sister abandons her, but thankfully, Mallory, shell-shocked and confused, is helped by a man and woman who bring her into a safe home along with other people. These survivors stay together and come to find out that the only way to survive is to avoid going outside–and that if you have to, you need to keep your eyes covered. The “entity” is outside, and if you look at it, you see your worst fears and end up killing yourself.

 

The movie then goes on about Mallory not only having her child but also adopting another one, and tells the story of how they survive. The movie itself succeeded in getting me hooked onto the storyline, and had me wondering what would happen every minute of the movie, which kept me anxious for what was going to happen next. It had me on the edge of my seat at some points, I didn’t know what was going to happen, and I was worried my favorite character was going to die. However, I also found it a bit all over the place, because it would go back and forth between the present and past what seemed like every few minutes. I also felt like a lot of questions were left unanswered.  I would recommend this movie to people who love a good suspenseful movie and who have maybe seen “A Quiet Place” and really liked it. I would rate this movie an 8 out of 10 overall.

 

By: Rylee Tuzzeo and Cesar Dominguez

“Halloween” Review

Recently, I watched one of the best movies of 2018–a horror movie called “Halloween.” Halloween is a horror movie that is supposed to be a sequel to the first and original “Halloween,” made in 1978. Although there have been 5 other movies produced in the span of 40 years, fans are asked to ignore them all–except for the first one, as the new one is still connected to it. The original “Halloween” is a movie about a man named Michael Myers who killed his oldest sister, Judith, when he was only six, by stabbing her–which led him to be sent away, but he eventually escaped at 21, in search of more people to kill. In fact, Michael murders almost anyone that comes across his path.

 

The new “Halloween” starts with Michael being held in a psych hospital-slash-prison facility. Two reporters want to learn more about Michael, so they go to visit him, only to find that he doesn’t talk, not even when they pull out his famous killing mask to show him. The two reporters are then informed that Michael will be transferred that night to a different facility. After their visit, the two reporters go to Laurie Strode to question her. Laurie Strode is from the original “Halloween,” where Michael killed her three friends when she was in high school and tried to kill her while she was babysitting. The whole story is focused on her search for revenge. Laurie lives in a secluded, high-security house in the middle of the woods, just waiting for him to come and try to kill her again. Later, the viewer learns about Laurie’s family; she has a rough relationship with her daughter and doesn’t see her granddaughter that much. Once the bus for the inmates who are being transported leaves the facility, Laurie is outside watching and has flashbacks that lead her to go to her family for help. The next scene shows that the bus has crashed and everyone inside of it, including Michael, have escaped.
Michael continues his killing spree from 40 years ago, and somehow, he ends up getting his mask back…
The movie then goes off of Michael’s escape and how Laurie protects herself and her family from the famous, scary “boogie man,” Michael Myers.
The movie itself succeeded in scaring me, to the point where I needed to cover one of my eyes to feel safe looking at the screen. However, I also found it a bit overly dramatic and unrealistic in some of the scenes. Overall, though, it was a good scare. It had me on the edge of my seat at some points and I didn’t know what was going to happen. I would recommend this movie to people who love the original “Halloween,” or those who just enjoy a well-made scary and suspenseful movie. I would rate this movie a 7.5 out of 10 compared to the first and other horror films that I have seen.

 

By: Rylee Tuzzeo

The Race to Destruction: Fast Fashion’s Effects on the World and Society

Since the Industrial Revolution in the 1800s, there has been a steady incline in the efficiency of clothing manufacturing, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that clothing companies began to really produce garments with intense speed. Fashion became easily accessible to the public for consumption at lower costs than ever before; the allure of having trendy and fashionable pieces in one’s closet catalyzed more demand for these cheap and fast clothes. Fast forward to 2019, and clothing brands such as H&M, Forever 21, Zara, Charlotte Russe, and TOPSHOP are everywhere and dominate the closets of children and adults alike. Who wouldn’t pass up a $3.90 pair of leggings or a $4 dress? This cycle of the production of “fast-wearing” clothes and even faster consumerism has paved the way for detrimental consequences for the producer, the environment, and the consumer.

 

Cheap labor is the euphemism, in this case, for sweatshop workers who unfortunately do not make enough money to surpass the poverty line–the workers who live heavily-clustered in slums without the basic necessities and resources needed to have a decent quality of life. In the 1990s, the textile industry began moving overseas at an extremely high rate–fewer labor laws overseas would lead to the opportunity to rapidly amass products and cheaply sell them without having to worry about workers’ wages and rights. The sweatshops aren’t safe; “accidental mass killings” aren’t just a tragedy of the early 20th century. They still happen even in the most technologically advanced generation we’ve seen thus far. In 2013, the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh collapsed, killing at least 1,138 workers making clothes. In response to this incident, a European-led coalition of unions and allied NGOs (non-governmental organizations) teamed up to work with Bangladeshi labor groups to create a worker safety initiative focused on empowering workers themselves, adopted largely by European firms and led by H&M but also adopted by several major U.S. brands. Even with such a development, the initiative has had some trouble staying afloat, and there is still more that needs to be done. How can we support the abuse and complete disregard of the very people that give us the things we crave most? Textile factories have also been found to be ripe with the foul stench of human trafficking, found even in the United States. Girls and women promised jobs and opportunity come only to be bound to a cycle of abuse and servitude; real people in terrible situations are grossly underpaid, mistreated, taken advantage of, subjected to devastating health problems, and even dying- to make disposable clothing for the “lucky” us, the consumers.

 

This radical mass production creates pollution, and the mass waste caused by consumers carelessly tossing old garments contributes to utter environmental chaos. During the farming process for cotton, the pesticides that are used are being linked to cancer and birth defects in farmers’ children in the Punjab region of India, as well as contributing to the development of a brain tumor in the case of one Texan farmer. The production of cotton, though only making up “2.4 percent of the world’s crops… is responsible for 24 percent of global insecticide sales and 11 percent of global pesticide sales,” as well as the immense consumption of freshwater–one t-shirt can take up to 2,700 liters of water to make–and the facts don’t stop there. American clothing waste, nearly 3.8 billion pounds annually, ends up in landfills, which amounts to nearly 80 pounds of textile per American citizen–which seems practically unimaginable. In addition, over 80 billion pieces of clothing are purchased each year, mostly by Americans, even though the clothing was made in outsourced low-income countries such as China and Bangladesh. The factory workers’ subjection to environmentally unstable working and living situations is appalling, yet Americans can’t seem to decrease their demand for trendy and cheap clothing. Textile waste begets the production of methane during decomposition and the dyes and chemicals used to color and create the textiles could sink into the soil; whole communities and agricultural systems are crumbling due to mass production of fast fashion.

 

As a modern consumer, there seems to be something extremely satisfying about inserting a card into a chip reader and walking out of a store with a new purchase. With fast-fashion retailers churning out new trends and styles many more times a year than in the high-fashion realm–either as a continuous release or around 12 seasons for fast-fashion retailers versus 2 seasons for typical high fashion–buyers are armed with the caveat that they must shop then and there in order to stay up-to-date with the most current style. Having this feeling of staying on top of “the game” tends to bring an immense feeling of instant gratification when compulsory shopping, a feeling that is catalyzed with each swipe or chip read, and to keep feeling that instant gratification, we buy. This cycle can very easily turn into an addiction with us giving immense support and money to the factories and fast-fashion companies.

 

As the public eyes turn more towards to atrocities associated with fast fashion production and retail, hopefully, change will come. Remove fast fashion from your spending habits, buy second-hand clothes, boycott the fast fashion industry, or even just learn about and advocate for sustainable clothing.

 

Sources:

Ross, Robert J.S. “The High Toll of Fast Fashion.” Dissent Magazine, http://www.dissentmagazine.org/blog/the-true-cost-review-fast-fashion-rana-plaza-accord.

Morgan, Andrew, director. The True Cost. 2015.

Bailey, Carolyn. “Slow Down: Fast Fashion Has Harmful Effects.” Trusted Clothes, 10 Sept. 2016, http://www.trustedclothes.com/blog/2016/02/09/slow-down-fast-fashion-has-harmful-effects/.

“The Impact of a Cotton T-Shirt.” WWF, World Wildlife Fund, 16 Jan. 2013, http://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/the-impact-of-a-cotton-t-shirt.

Bick, Rachel, et al. “The Global Environmental Injustice of Fast Fashion.” Environmental Health, vol. 17, no. 1, 2018, doi:10.1186/s12940-018-0433-7.

 

To learn more, watch The True Cost on Netflix.

 

By: Aly Sickles

 

Why Travel Is So Important

We live our lives in a truly connected time; it seems that every day we are learning lessons that show us that in the modern age, humans are more globally connected than at any other point in history— languages can be learned in a matter of months just by opening an app, pictures from virtually any place on Earth can be shared with anybody and everybody, and more of us are learning about other cultures more quickly and easily than ever before. The interest in travel is increasing, but many are still left dreaming of a week lounging under the Indonesian sun or walking on glaciers in Iceland without any catalyst for action, and if more people knew the benefits, other than the stunning photos and experiences, of travel, that would change. I’ve been to eight countries in seventeen years, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons from my voyages. Here are some of the highlights:

 

 

  • Travel teaches you first-hand how to adapt to (almost) any situation

 

      • The beautiful pictures you see on Instagram only show a small fraction of travel, often hiding the not-so-beautiful trials faced during travel. From losing baggage to getting sick in a country where you’re not fluent in the language, many things can go wrong, but you learn to adapt and problem solve.

 

  • You can get to know other people and cultures for yourself, not just through a lease, textbook, or screen.

 

      • In the age of social media, it’s easy to look at somebody’s profile, acknowledge that they live somewhere cool, and then move on with your life. When you travel, you get to learn what life is like for other people, for the most part, and you begin to appreciate the difference between cultures.

 

  • You lose the -isms (“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain”)

 

    • Travel reveals that, no matter who you are or where you live, we all share cultural universals–a sociological principle that establishes the fact that the human race is more alike than many nowadays seem to think. Humanity is interconnected, and discovering that will open up a sympathetic, and more importantly empathetic, door.

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness” – M. Twain

 

  • You gain experiences that, while shared with others, are wholly personal

 

      • Your own experiences are just that– your own. When traveling, you get to keep something all for yourself to hold dear in your heart, and to hold on to forever.

 

  • You gain a better appreciation for life

 

      • It’s the little things– the sunrise over the bustling morning market in Marrakech or the crowded faces around flaming embers in Finland– that truly make life beautiful. When you travel, you’re able to find more of those moments in your own daily life, and your normal suddenly becomes vibrant and beautiful.

 

  • You get a break from the humdrum of daily routine.

 

      • Let’s face it: daily routine becomes boring after doing the same things day in and day out. When you travel, you are able to have a great recess from the monotony we tend to get stuck in.

 

  • Life is short, why not live it to the fullest?

 

    • The lifespan of an average American is only 78 years; why not have as many adventures as possible? To explore is to fulfill a rather youthful desire in one’s heart, and to do so brings such a fundamental joy.

 

With all of the lovely things that the world has to offer, why not take advantage of anything you can? Travel isn’t always easily accessible, but it could also be walking on a different road or reading a book from the library about a different country; anybody can travel anywhere they’d like and reap the benefits that it brings. Peace out.

 

By: Aly Sickles

“Smallfoot” Movie Review

Are you looking for a new animated movie to enjoy with your family? One that is family friendly and shares a valuable lesson? Well, you’re in luck! The new animated movie “Smallfoot” has just hit the theaters, and everyone you know is either talking about it or about to be. The cast includes famous actors and actresses like Zendaya Coleman, Lebron James, Channing Tatum, and James Cordon! You don’t want to miss out on this phenomenal cast. Another reason to watch the movie is that it carries an important lesson that anyone can learn from–it teaches viewers to never judge others by their appearance and to trust the people around you. This movie is just as entertaining for adults as it is for young children. The soundtrack has catchy songs, the adventure will keep everyone wanting more, and the movie’s stellar comedy will make anyone laugh.  The movie starts off introducing us to a civilization of Yetis who believe that humans are dangerous. It all starts with a Yeti known as Migo–while adventuring, he notices a human-sized shoe and footprints on the floor. Once he notices the strange footprint, he goes home, triumphantly chanting that he has found a “smallfoot.” Everyone dismisses his excitement and considers him to be delusional. However, Migo’s friends trust him and believe that there is another “creature” other than a Yeti. The adventurous band of friends decide to search for the mysterious human to prove that they are real.

 

The Yetis start by going separate ways to find the human and, eventually, come across many clues. Migo and Meechee head far away from their home into the unknown and soon find a human store. Eventually, a human appears and Migo attempts to talk to the young man. Much to his dismay, though, the human can’t understand what the Yeti is saying. Communication between the two doesn’t work very well since their languages are both different. On the other hand, the young human, played by James Corden, is shocked by the event. The movie soon reveals to the audience that he has studied Yetis his whole life. Despite the initial shock, the two begin to admire each others’ presences; the human begins to take pictures of the Yeti while vlogging his unexpected experience. Migo is confused by the young man’s actions, but continues to attempt to communicate with the man. James is taken aback by the Yeti’s insistence and believes that the creature is starting to threatening him. He suddenly faints from fear, and the Yeti cheerfully picks up the human to show off to the other Yetis back home. In conclusion, “Smallfoot” is a fun, feel-good movie that will engage the audience from the start to end. Don’t forget to hit the theaters when you have a chance! You don’t want to miss this amazing movie!

 

By: Aly Sickles

 

Malaysia Travel Review

Malaysia is often known as the melting pot of Asia; various ethnic groups (from an assortment of religious groups in the Malays to Indians and Chinese)  live there with the native Dayaks. The result of this mixture of cultures is an astounding array of cuisine, festivals, experiences, and people to meet. Aside from the cultural beauty, Malaysia is known for its idyllic natural beauty in the beaches, diverse animal species, equatorial national parks, ancient rainforests, and islands. Here is your guide to travelling the beautiful Malaysia (on the cheap):

 

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  1. The City of Penang

Penang is the lesser-known foodie capital of both Asia and the world. Because of the ethnic diversity, cheap food, and authentic cooking traditions, the gastronomic scene in this city is nothing less than eye-opening and astounding. Street food is an integral part of Asian cuisine, and Penang does it best. From Georgetown’s Chinatown to its Little India, walking the streets of Penang offers a sensory overload of fresh spices and aromatic dishes being served. Start at the waterfront, ready to walk and eat your heart out, then go to Gurney Drive to continue around the city square. You can get anything from freshly-cooked meat to biryani, from chili dishes to Hainan Chicken Rice. One of the most iconic dishes of Malaysia is Char Koay Teow, a noodle dish that evolved in the Guangdong province in China and combines prawns stir-fried with flat noodles, soy and chili sauces, blood cockles, bean sprouts, and often other proteins like egg or chicken.

(Information taken from a great article on Matador: https://matadornetwork.com/read/penang-malaysia-food/)

 

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  1. Batu Caves

Located in Selangor, the Batu Caves are the site of a Hindu temple and a large shrine of the Hindu God (Brahman), in addition to the three caves. If you like animals, monkeys are everywhere here, but make sure to guard your personal belongings, as they’re known to steal. The limestone on the caves is also perfect for rock-climbing enthusiasts. The official tour of the caves is around $50, but you can explore on your own for as little as $5– a strategy recommended more from various attendee reviews. Take a gander at some of the most beautiful forms of geological growth!

 

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  1.  Langkawi Sky Cab

If the “steepest cable-car trip in the world” title isn’t enough for you,  the picturesque views of the stunning beaches and tropical forests surely will be. The Langkawi Sky Cab offers an astounding view for $17 per adult ticket–which may seem a little pricey, but the experience is priceless. It’s a cross between a closed Ferris wheel and a ski-lift (or vernacular), which easily makes it easy to feel on top of the world.

(http://www.panoramalangkawi.com/skycab/)

 

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  1. Teman Negara Hike

While being in the major cities is fun and upbeat, nothing beats being out in nature, and with the Teman Negara Hiking Trails, it’s even easier to feel tranquility in the wraps of a beautiful rainforest– the oldest one in the world, that is. There are a myriad of trail options, from one that lasts an hour to one for nearly 7 days. You can even explore the caves or do their famous “canopy-walk” suspended among the tall trees and magnificent birds.

(Learn more at http://www.tamannegaratravel.com/taman-negara-trails-trek/)

 

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  1. Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre

$7 can take you far in Malaysia, but nothing might be as spectacular as the orangutan rehabilitation centre in the Sabah District of North Borneo in Malaysia. The centre primarily rehabilitates young orangutans orphaned as a result of illegal logging and deforestation or illegally being traded and kept as pets, and visitors can have a chance to see the renewal of life for these magnificent animals. Whether zoology is one of your interests or not, this experience is an unforgettable one.

(Visit their website at https://www.orangutan-appeal.org.uk/about-us/sepilok-orangutan-rehabilitation-centre)

 

By: Ally Sickles

Black Panther Review

Black Panther is the long awaited Marvel release starring Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa/Black Panther, Michael B. Jordan as Erik Killmonger, and Danai Gurira as Okoye. This film truly hit it out of the park with a great cast, fun action scenes, and great comedy. Boseman is impossible to dislike as he gives a wonderful portrayal of a man becoming king and protector of his country in a changing world. The villain, Killmonger, while obviously being a villain, had motivation–motivation as well as logic. This was refreshing to see from a Marvel movie–as of late, their villains have been lacking. Another major score for Black Panther is that it does not feel like one giant trailer. Recent Marvel films have sadly fallen into this formula; it feels as though they cannot stand alone. This is not the case with Black Panther at all.

It was so refreshing to see a film so rich with culture and vibrant with beautiful cinematography. Though the film is set in the fictional country of Wakanda in Africa, the culture, costume/hair design, and even language are drew heavy inspiration from real life African tribes and cultures. It was a beautiful and inspiring piece of art.

However, this is not a perfect movie. When a film is so highly anticipated, it seems almost wrong to say anything against it. But there are a few scenes in which the CGI is very apparent. Coming from a movie with such a large budget, seeing cheesy CG or almost unfinished elements can be disappointing, but these scenes are nowhere near enough to ruin the movie.

Black Panther did not disappoint audiences. Scoring $201.8 million in just three days, it has secured its place as the fifth highest grossing film in America (opening weekend) and the second highest grossing Marvel film, with the first being The Avengers (2012). It deserves a solid A-.

 

Written By: Hannah Baird

Image Credit to Rotten Tomatoes

 

Westworld Review

 

Imagine, a world in which you may enter and explore every depraved and honorable desire that has ever seized your attention. An arena in which the execution of such desires comes as easily as breathing, and your peers similarly indulge their own unwound imaginations so that they cannot cast judgement upon another’s method of satiation nor have it cast upon them. A place where fantasies of all colors and avenues can be exacted. An escape where you may appease impulses of lust, crime, heroism, avarice, vices and virtues and all roads in-between without consequence or lasting responsibility. A haven of sin so that it cannot exist. And then you can leave, returning to the real world and its mundane normalcy.

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That type of world is Westworld. It is explored in the HBO drama Westworld, based off of the 1973 movie of the same name. The show explores a near-future historical reimagination that wonderfully blends the crisp stylization of a modern world with the natural awe-evoking grittiness of the western era. Westworld itself is an adult theme park set in the Wild West and populated by the hosts, hyper-humanoid animatronics programmed to adhere to certain narratives. The guests, once they pay an expectedly exorbitant admission fee, immerse themselves into park and engage in the scripted narratives that each host is looped on or create their own adventures in the lawless land. The premise, of course, is genius and allows for an incredible analysis into the boundaries (or lack thereof) of consciousness and humanity in both the android and human characters.

The stellar cast—headed by the incredible talents of Anthony Hopkins (Dr. Ford, the creative director and creator of the park), Eddie Harris (The Man in Black, a mysterious guest who is a veteran of the park), Jeffrey Wright (Bernard, a programing specialist and Head of Behavior for the park), Thandie Newton (Maeve, a host who breaks her narrative of running a brothel)—is lauded highly and for good reason, for their intriguing portrayal of complex characters whose motivations and histories are largely a mystery from us is a task not often completed let alone done with such mastery. As expected for such a renowned television program, the writing and directing are superb; whereas some shows turn to spectacle to engage an audience, the creators of this show turn to cerebral, thought-provoking dialogue that strikes both poles of the soul—the mind and the heart—often at the same moments. The technical side of Westworld is also of a high caliber, for while the aforementioned practitioners of their craft received merely (but well-deserved) nominations from the just-concluded 2017 Primetime Emmy’s, those behind the magic of sound mixing, hairstyling, make-up, production design, main title design, cinematography, sound editing, picture editing, and casting were additionally nominated and (for the first three categories) a few garnered the winged award. There are certain classes under which series’ will fall under, and despite there only being one season (season two premieres in 2018), Westworld is of a distinctively higher quality than most.

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The core of the story, as alluded to earlier, is the enthralling exploration of the search for and result of what is referred to as “The Maze” (the path to consciousness). Dolores Abernathy (played by the captivating Evan Rachel Wood) and Maeve Millay, two hosts in considerably disparate narrative loops, each have arcs that deal with the realization that there is a maze. The former is aided by two guests, William (played by Jimmi Simpson, a first-time guest hesitant of the park at first but later resolved to help Dolores) and Logan (played by Ben Barnes, a frequent guest well-acquainted with the indulgences there are to be had), and is centered in the park. The latter is (reluctantly) assisted by two low-level host cleaners (they essentially refurbish the hosts after they are killed as a product of their narratives or of guests). There is another who searches for the maze, however, and that is the Man in Black, an incredibly mysterious and stone-cold stockholder of the park who aims to find the secrets left behind by Arnold Weber, Dr. Ford’s friend and co-creator of Westworld. Dr. Ford, Bernard Lowe, and the other high-level officials that run the park, on the other hand, are preoccupied with assessing and rectifying the causes of malfunctioning hosts (those who had somehow gotten too close to the center of the maze and were unable to comprehend their own comprehension of their own self) that no longer followed basic protocols such as the inability to hurt any non-host intentionally. Behind the ostensible world presented before us, however, there are subtle hints that there is a greater game behind the scenes—a sort of maze that the storytelling builds for us.  The center of the maze for the audience, then, cannot be consciousness but may be a greater understanding of such consciousness; we may come to realize, as the Man in Black said, that we are most ourselves when presented with trauma. Trauma is a recurring theme throughout the episodes, lurking in plain sight as the answer to that which cannot be solved. The unique presentation and scrutiny of such intelligent concepts and themes that the premise and exceptional cast and crew allow for are what distinguishes Westworld from the expanse of narratives already concerning themselves with the pursuit of introspection and understanding.

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And the marvelous ideas and the underlying answers and hidden revelations are all wound up in this elaborate bow that we begin to untie in the first episode—confused but enticed—until the final two episodes in which we succeed and learn the truth behind the secrets that taunted us while finding another, more elaborate bow as the present inside. The twists of this show—while one will attempt to guess them and often will succeed—are so satisfying. A good twist is not crafted on unpredictability alone, but mostly plausibility. The seeds are planted in the early episodes and we practically tend to their growth throughout until we realize, just as the storytellers usher us to, that we’ve been watching a sunflower seed birth an African elephant; two binaries that we are given and reminded are separate entities are revealed to be one whole, shattering our illusions and awakening us to the reality the maze offers. And that is the point of the show: to awaken us to this “maze” as we follow the characters who try to do the same. To display a world in which this maze is the foundation and purpose, where despite locked destinies the effect of trauma is as visceral and far-reaching as it is in the real one. To show that the random and all-encompassing nature of trauma is not something to fear but rather appreciate, for it grounds us in a consciousness greater than that of the bicameral mind. Imagine, a show in which the very acquisition and functionality of consciousness is depicted through the interconnected plots of real, human characters whether programmed or not while still maintaining the conventional purpose of any show: to entertain.

That type of show is Westworld.

Rating: 4.6 Violent Ends for 5 Violent Delights

By: Ryan Hill

Photo Credits to HBO